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Posted On:
1 December 2012

Posted By
Michael Turtle

Categories :
Cuisine

12 Comments

Cooking up a storm in Yogyakarta

Posted on : 1 December 2012
Categories : Cuisine

Who amongst us really like to think about where our food comes from? As long as it appears clean and tasty on our table, that’s all that matters. And sometimes – like in the restaurants of South East Asia – it’s often not worth the mental anguish of wondering what’s going on in the kitchen. It will be delicious – tick. It won’t make you sick – tick. So who cares about anything else, right?

Well… in this case, wrong. But only because this is one of the most fascinating and visually-interesting kitchens I have ever seen.

Cooking up a storm in Yogyakarta

Gudeg Yu Djum is one of the most famous restaurants in the Indonesian city of Yogyakarta. It’s not fancy – there are no stars or hats or pretensions associated with it. But it’s known across the city for doing one of the region’s most popular dishes well. The dish is called ‘Nasi Gudeg’ and it’s essentially boiled jackfruit covered in a coconut milk sauce, served with rice, chicken and a hard-boiled egg. This is what it looks like (after a few bites):

Cooking up a storm in Yogyakarta

But the bright and clean meal comes from smoke and darkness, from a burning cavern behind the scenes. As I'll show you now.

Here the ‘gudeg’, the main ingredient is being cooked. It’s made from sliced young jackfruit which is being boiled in these large pots. They have water mixed with brown sugar and salt in them, and will be left on the fire overnight for more than 12 hours.

Cooking up a storm in Yogyakarta

In this large pan near the fireplaces, coconut milk is being simmered to reduce the liquid until it turns thick. The result will be sauce called ‘arek’ which will be combined with the boiled jackfruit to make the gudeg.

Cooking up a storm in Yogyakarta

A separate room at the back of the restaurant is the only space of the kitchen that has electric lighting. Half a dozen people are cleaning and dividing whole raw chickens. One of the women gestures at everyone in the room and tells me they “are all family”.

Cooking up a storm in Yogyakarta

These large pots above open fires are being used to make ‘santan’, which is a sauce of coconut milk mixed with salt, shallots and a bit of sugar. The heat in this room is extremely high so this man is working with his shirt off.

Cooking up a storm in Yogyakarta

Away from the heat and near a breeze, this elderly woman is preparing chillis to be served with the nasi gudeg.

Cooking up a storm in Yogyakarta

And here, in the section of the kitchen with the most natural light, a woman is sitting solitary and silent while she rips apart banana leaves. They’ll be used for the presentation of the meal.

Cooking up a storm in Yogyakarta

And that’s it. A lot of effort clearly goes on behind the scenes in the spacious and sprawling kitchen area of the restaurant. Hours and hours of work for a Indonesia dish that is consumed within minutes. But it is tasty… very tasty, in fact. Which you hope makes it all worthwhile.

Tag : Yogyakarta's Dining Guide, Yogyakarta

 

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